HOUSING RESEARCH

WHITE PAPERS (CLICK TITLE TO READ/DOWNLOAD)

RAFT 2015-2016: Residential Assistance for Families in Transition on the Cape and Islands (Published November 2016)

Cape Cod may appear to be a paradise, but underneath that facade are pockets of deep poverty. Thanks to state funding through the RAFT (Residential Assistance for Families in Transition) program, HAC has been able to address those poverty issues by helping low-income families who are on the verge of becoming homeless. This is a companion piece to RAFT in Massachusetts that shows just how valuable the program is to those on Cape Cod and the Islands. By investing $234,232 in HAC's RAFT program, the state saved $2.8 million by keeping families out of shelter.  

RAFT on Cape Cod Cover (November 2016).jpg RAFT ON THE CAPE AND ISLANDS is a snapshot of how RAFT funding is helping HAC address the region's poverty issues by keeping low-income families housed and preventing them from becoming homeless and keeping them out of shelter.  

RAFT IN MASSACHUSETTS (2015-2016): A survey of the Residential Assistance for Families in Transition program (Published November 2016)

The RAFT (Residential Assistance for Families in Transition) program is one of the largest homelessness and eviction prevention programs in the Commonwealth, stabilizing at-risk families before they enter the emergency shelter system. HAC's latest report, done in conjunction with the Regional Housing Network of Massachusetts, shows the efficacy of RAFT and the benefit to providing state aid in keeping families housed and out of emergency shelter. 

RAFT Massachusetts Cover (November 2016).jpg RAFT IN MASSACHUSETTS provides a detailed look at FY 2015 and FY 2016 funding for RAFT and how that money has effectively served to stabilize Massachusetts families who have been at risk of homelessness during the past two fiscal years. 


LINED UP FOR HOUSING: FEDERAL RENTAL VOUCHER WAITING LISTS AND LEASE-UP RATES ON THE CAPE AND ISLANDS IN 2015
(PUBLISHED SEPTEMBER 30, 2016)

We all know that finding a year-round apartment on Cape Cod, Nantucket or Martha's Vineyard is no easy feat, even during the best of times. But for those with federal Housing Choice rental vouchers, it's even more difficult; our latest report concludes that there is only a 50 percent chance those with a voucher will get to use it here in the region, based upon data from 2015. 

The problem is magnified by the fact that rental voucher waiting lists can take as long as 7-10 years on Cape Cod which is five times longer than the national average. This is occurring despite the fact that a study done by the federal department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) shows there is no more effective means for stabilizing at-risk families than a rental subsidy. 

What can be done? Lined Up For Housing looks not only at the problem, but possible solutions to the federal rental voucher dilemma that exists on Cape Cod. 

Lined_Up_Revised_Cover_September_2016.jpg Lined Up For Housing is an in-depth assessment of the region's federal rental voucher program and how we can address the problems that currently exist with the program.     

CLOSER TO HOME: SUBSTANCE ABUSE TREATMENT OPTIONS FOR THE HOMELESS ON THE CAPE AND THE ISLANDS (PUBLISHED MARCH 23, 2016)

HAC's first white paper, Closer to Home, highlights substance abuse disorder as it's an illness pervasive among our clients; it’s affected about 80 percent of our shelter guests and many of the other people we help with housing issues.

The HAC report (click the image below to read) includes interviews with local and state experts in the health care, housing and substance abuse treatment fields, and highlights key data from governmental, academic and independent studies. It takes a close look at what treatment options are available here, as well as examples from elsewhere.

Closer_to_Home_White_Paper.jpg HAC's first white paper, "Closer To Home: Substance Abuse Treatment Options For The Homeless On The Cape And Islands" explores the drug and alcohol treatment options for Cape Cod's homeless population.