Housing Assistance Corporation Blog

Big Fix-a-Thon Coming to Barnstable

Posted by Chris Kazarian on Mon, May 20, 2019 @ 04:36 PM

Big Fix Kick-Off (May 2019)-4

Gary (left) and Alex Graham of Graham LLC are among the local builders who will be participating in our 10th Annual Big Fix-a-Thon in October. 

The Big Fix-a-Thon will be coming to Barnstable in October and Housing Assistance is currently seeking recipients to apply for the fundraising day of service.

Now in its tenth year, the event mobilizes nearly 300 volunteers to make small repairs to homes owned by seniors, veterans, and disabled residents in one town on Cape Cod.

Tasks done during the day include yard work; interior and exterior painting; repair or replacement of exterior stairs and fences; and light plumbing and electrical work.

“It really does transform a home,” Housing Assistance CEO Alisa Magnotta Galazzi said last month during a kick-off event geared towards volunteers that was held at Shepley Showcase in Hyannis. “It makes it so people can stay housed and age in place which is a critical component of our mission.”

Big Fix Kick-Off (May 2019)-1

At last month's Big Fix-a-Thon Kick-Off Tony Shepley talked about the importance of giving back. 

Tony Shepley, president of Shepley Wood Products, which not only sponsors the event, but annually fields a team of volunteers for the Big Fix-a-Thon spoke about how it aligns with his company’s mission. “From a sponsorship perspective, what gets us involved in this really... is the concept of repaying your civic obligation,” he said. “We call it civic rent. You put a little back in, you get a whole lot back.”

Volunteers can make their impact go even further by raising funds to support Housing Assistance’s year-round programs. Applications for volunteers will be available starting Saturday, June 1.

Click this link or the blue button below for online recipient applications.

Recipient Application

Hard copies are available at our Hyannis office at 460 West Main Street. They can also be picked up at Barnstable Town Hall; the Greater Hyannis Chamber of Commerce; the Cape Cod Chamber of Commerce; the Barnstable Senior Center; and the Hyannis and Centerville public libraries.

In order to apply, recipients must reside in either Hyannis or Centerville. The deadline to submit an application is Friday, June 14.

Sponsor the Big Fix-a-Thon!

Businesses interested in sponsoring the Big Fix-a-Thon should contact Deanna Bussiere at dbussiere@haconcapecod.org or 508-771-5400, ext. 270.

Sponsor the Big Fix-A-Thon

Tags: Shepley Wood Products, Community Service, Big Fix, Alisa Galazzi, home repair, Tony Shepley, Hyannis, Centerville, Barnstable, Barnstable Big Fix

Walk for Hope to Raise Prevention Funds

Posted by Chris Kazarian on Fri, May 17, 2019 @ 01:38 PM

 

Walk Facebook Custom Share Image_Falmouthv2

On Sunday, June 2, you can take meaningful steps to prevent homelessness on Cape Cod and the Islands by taking part in Housing Assistance’s Walk for Hope.

The agency will be holding two walks, one in Hyannis and the other in Falmouth, that will help raise funds for the agency’s prevention programs. 

“With the cost of living and housing continuing to rise, many families in our region are one or two paychecks away from becoming homeless,” said Alisa Magnotta Galazzi, CEO of Housing Assistance Corporation. “This year’s Walk for Hope will allow participants to raise awareness of the issue and help address it.”

The Hyannis Walk for Hope will start and end at our Angel House shelter. The Falmouth Walk for Hope will start and end at the Falmouth Village Green. Both walks will consist of 5 miles and kick off with registration at 1 pm. The walks begin at 2 pm.

Participants are encouraged to register in advance and raise funds for Housing Assistance’s homeless prevention programs which provide one-time emergency funds to pay utility bills or rent or mortgage payments so individuals and families can stay in their homes. Last year, Housing Assistance supported 412 households on Cape Cod and the Islands through its homeless prevention funding. Since the program began in 1993, it has assisted approximately 10,000 clients in need.

The walk is ideal for church and community groups, civic organizations, youth groups, and businesses.  Individuals and groups interested in participating, can sign up by clicking the appropriate button below or register on-site the day of the walk.

Register for the Falmouth Walk

Register for the Hyannis Walk

Among those to already sign up for the Walk for Hope is Rabbi Elias Lieberman of the Falmouth Jewish Congregation as well as several of its members. “Falmouth Jewish Congregation feels privileged to support the Walk for Hope and the vital work of Housing Assistance Corporation,” Rabbi Lieberman said. “When we join the Walk for Hope this year, our feet will be praying a prayer of action and commitment to help address the housing needs on Cape Cod.”

Help Spread the Word! 

With your help, this can be a great community event that makes a difference in the lives of our neighbors in need. It starts with awareness so please invite your friends, family, and colleagues to our Facebook events: 

 

 

Tags: Project Prevention, homelessness prevention, homeless prevention, Community Service, Falmouth, Hyannis, Walk for Hope

Cape Cod 5 Gives Shelter a Makeover

Posted by Chris Kazarian on Tue, Oct 02, 2018 @ 10:34 AM
CC5 Cataumet-4Cape Cod Five’s Joe Beasley (from left), HAC’s Maintenance Supervisor Keith Trott, Cape Cod Five’s Elaine Sweeney, and Paula Mallard, the facility director for the Village at Cataumet.

Over the course of one day at the beginning of last month, roughly 40 interns from Cape Cod Five Cents Savings Bank came together to give HAC’s Village at Cataumet a much needed facelift.

The group painted the exterior of the 18-unit family shelter from white to gray. Combined with new black doors and shutters, installed by HAC’s maintenance department and several contractors, the makeover provided the Bourne shelter with an entirely new appearance.

“This hasn’t been touched in 25 years,” said HAC’s Maintenance Supervisor Keith Trott of the shelter. “This is going to be quite a transformation.”

He made the statement on the morning the interns were about to begin their work. Before they did, he thanked them for their contributions to HAC. “This is probably a $40,000 paint job we’re going to try to knock out with all your help,” he said. “It goes a long way and lets us have funds to do other things with.”

CC5 Cataumet-3Approximately 40 Cape Cod Five interns spent a day painting the Village at Cataumet family shelter in Bourne.

Intern Alyssa Birchfield, a sophomore at the University of California, Berkeley, said, “it’s nice to be doing something for the community.”

Former intern Joe Beasley, who now works at the bank as a talent management administrative coordinator, said these types of community service projects are a key component of his company’s culture. “Cape Cod 5 really prides itself on giving back to the community and helping out those in need,” he said.

Tags: Family Shelter, The Village at Cataumet, Paula Mallard, Philanthropy, Community Service, Village at Cataumet, Keith Trott, giving back, Cape Cod 5

Osterville Church Gives Back to Angel House

Posted by Chris Kazarian on Thu, Mar 08, 2018 @ 05:25 PM
DSC_9655-1.jpgMary Beebe (from left), Anne Minor and Robert Bartholomay recently helped paint one of the rooms at Angel House as a way to give back to our clients. 

On the last Thursday in January, staff at HAC’s Angel House shelter in Hyannis held a graduation ceremony for 30-year-old Samantha, who had been at the shelter with her six-month-old son for a year, recovering from the dual traumas of homelessness and addiction. 


By the next day, Samantha had moved out of the shelter and four volunteers from St. Peter’s Episcopal Church in Osterville – Mary and Will Beebe, Robert Bartholomay and Anne Minor – were busy giving her former room a much-needed facelift before the next client arrived on Monday.

Over the course of two days the group painted the room as a way to give back to those in need. While the church’s members donate food to HAC’s Scattered Sites shelter on a monthly basis, this was their first time at Angel House.

In between paint strokes, the group spoke about the importance of this type of work. “It makes you feel good when you help somebody,” Robert said.

“Any time you do something good, it matters,” Mary added.

Tags: Family Shelter, Community Service, Angel House, charitable giving, St. Peter's Episcopal Church

A Barn Raising at Community Green with Cornell Students

Posted by Chris Kazarian on Thu, May 05, 2016 @ 12:04 PM
Cornell_Day_4-7.jpgCornell University students were joined by guests at the NOAH Shelter and HAC staff in building a barn at the agency's Community Green property. 

A little more than a week before five Cornell students visited Cape Cod at the end of March, a small patch of land in Sandwich where a miniature donkey named Cooper, some goats and chickens roamed lay vacant.

With the guidance of HAC’s maintenance supervisor Keith Trott, those students helped transform that vacant land into a barn on the agency’s Community Green property where the goal is to one day build 60 affordable apartments.

The project was tackled as part of Cornell University’s alternative spring break, giving college students an opportunity to give back and learn about the impact social service agencies make in the lives of others. Over the past 12 years Cornell has sent a contingent to Cape Cod where they have assisted HAC in its mission to ensure all have access to safe, stable, decent housing.

“I guess I wanted to spend my time and energy away from school doing something valuable,” said Cornell freshman Evelyn Shan as to why she signed up for the trip. It was a similar response for those who joined Shan, including seniors Kentaro Asai of Yokohama, Japan, and Ben Kennet of Silver Spring, Maryland; junior Stacey Kim of Anaheim, California; and freshman Kyle (Eliot) Huang of Salta Lake City, Utah.

Over the course of four days, the Cornell students focused on building the barn while also taking time to visit the NOAH Shelter, to bowl at Ryan Family Amusements in Hyannis with children staying at The Village at Cataumet and to speak with staff about the work they do at HAC.

NOAH Guests Assist With Project

At Community Green, the group was joined by four guests staying at the NOAH Shelter – George, Gayla, Mike and George, all of whom lent their talents to the barn project. Shelter director Greg Bar expressed his appreciation for HAC giving the four the opportunity to help. “I’m just so proud of you guys,” Bar said to the NOAH guests at a farewell dinner for the Cornell students held at Shepley Showcase. “I saw the results after the first day. You just looked brighter.”

Kim, who served as the trip leader, spoke to the passion that staff like Bar have for the work they do and the people they serve. “I guess the really impressive thing about HAC are the people who are invested in housing and homelessness,” she said. “There is a lot of heart that goes into what you do. It is so moving and it really touched me.”

Cornell_Day_4-9.jpgTrip leader Stacey Kim (left) and Evelyn Shan show off some of the tools used in building the Community Green barn. 

HAC’s volunteers bring a similar sense of energy to supporting the agency, something that Kennet spoke to as he mentioned the more than 44,000 meals they serve on an annual basis to those at the NOAH Shelter. “I think it is good to know that volunteers are valued and their work means something and it is important,” he said.

The goal at HAC, CEO Rick Presbrey told the students, is to create a welcoming culture, particularly for “the people we serve because they often aren’t welcomed where they go.” That extended to the group from Cornell who he praised for their efforts as he urged them to continue to be charitable, leaving them with this piece of advice: “something magical happens when one person helps another.”

 

Tags: alternative spring break, Cornell University, Community Green, Community Service, volunteerism

A Family Bond Inspires a Connecticut Teen to Give Back

Posted by Chris Kazarian on Fri, Oct 02, 2015 @ 02:01 PM

Thomas_Rosiello_Photo-1

There is a power to music that is difficult to measure. It not only serves as a form of creative expression, but it moves people to do extraordinary things.

And in May, it did just that inside a home in Weston, Connecticut. There, far removed from Cape Cod, music inspired 45 people to donate $11,286 to HAC’s Angel House shelter.

The connection between Angel House and Weston, starts in Osterville, where longtime HAC supporter Margaret Mullin lives. Every summer Mullin’s 23 grandchildren visit, including her youngest, 17-year-old Thomas Rosiello.

For roughly three weeks during the past four summers, Thomas has become a familiar face at Angel House where he volunteers at the shelter’s play space, helping play and care for its children. “I function as an extra person, doing whatever is needed: playing with kids, cleaning up after snacks, anything that I can help with,” he said. “The best part for me is playing with the kids. It’s not only fun for them, but fun for me.”

He credited his grandmother, who he calls Greta, for motivating him to donate his time to HAC while on summer vacation. “I saw clearly that she was a large supporter of Angel House and it meant something to her,” he said. “With her being one of my heroes, I saw it as a great chance to do some good and support something which she clearly thought was special.”

When not visiting Cape Cod, Thomas spends his time in Weston, where he lives with his parents Barbara and Robert Rosiello. It is there that Thomas came up with an idea to extend his support of Angel House even further. He decided to organize a concert, performing with The Hopkins Harmonaires, an all-male acapela group at Hopkins School where he is currently a senior.

Thomas_Rosiello_Photo_2The Hopkins Harmonaires at this spring's Angel House fundraiser in Connecticut.

So this spring, Thomas invited friends and family over for an evening of music that included everything from classics to more modern selections like “Wagon Wheel” by Mumford & Sons and “Here We Go” by Dispatch.

Aside from his parents and grandmother, the nearly 75 people in attendance were unfamiliar with Angel House, a Hyannis shelter focused on providing treatment and support for mothers – all are homeless and overcoming some form of addiction – and their children. So Thomas gave a short speech, explaining the work being done there and his ties to the shelter and the people it serves.

And that is when people gave.

Encouraging such philanthropy is something that was instilled in Thomas at a young age. “It has always been a large focus,” Thomas said.

His experience at Angel House has only cemented those early childhood lessons and the importance of being civic-minded. “They sort of help you be happy,” he said of his motivation for this fundraiser: the children in the shelter. “Particularly at Angel House, with them being in such tough circumstances, when I show up, everyone puts a smile on my face.” 

Donate to Angel House

Tags: homelessness, Thomas Rosiello, Philanthropy, Community Service, Fundraising, Angel House